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RFID tags! SPYWARE
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wawadave
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2004 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

link reminds me of a movie.thx 1138 and a few others.
big brothers only starting to watch!

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2004 3:53 pm    Post subject: Automotive RFID Gets Rolling Reply with quote

hello
i can see useing this if it was safety related but they will want all cars to have rfid tags. for easy toll collection. and i can see speeding being detached use this same tech!

theres a good dissuction going on at slash dot right now
http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/04/13/1822209

Automotive RFID Gets Rolling
The Federal Highway Administration awards a contract to develop a 5.9 GHz RFID system to cut road fatalities in the U.S. by 50%.

By Jonathan Collins

Apr. 13, 2004—With government funding and access to a large swath of radio spectrum, four RFID developers are starting work on a new generation of RFID products aimed at bringing greater safety and new wireless applications to U.S. roads. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has called on Mark IV Industries, Raytheon, SIRIT and TransCore—companies that supply systems for the largest RFID toll deployments in the U.S.—to jointly develop dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) technology systems for a trial as part of the agency’s efforts to cut road fatalities in the U.S. by 50% within 10 years.

Richard Schnacke

The goal of the group and its government backers is to use DRSC to enhance the safety and the productivity of the nation's transportation system. The DSRC prototype initiative is a prerequisite for introducing new roadway applications such as issuing alerts to drivers about impending intersection collisions, rollovers, weather-related road hazards, or warning a driver that his vehicle is going too fast to safely negotiate an upcoming curve. DRSC technology could also be used for commercial applications such as downloading driving maps.

Proponents of the technology maintain that DSRC systems will also be able to replace existing highway RFID applications such as automatic toll collection systems like EZ-Pass. “There is nothing that current systems do that DSRC systems won’t be able to do in a breeze—while it’s idling in fact,” says Richard Schnacke, vice president of industry relations for TransCore and the chairman and spokesperson for the DSRC Industry Consortium. The group’s members consists not only of the four companies selected to develop the DRSC-system prototype, but also includes Atheros and Intersil, two major suppliers of 802.11 chipsets.

The promise of DRSC, which its proponents consider a subset of RFID, is to deliver a far greater data rate and range to wireless highway applications. “Compared with existing RFID toll applications, DRSC will deliver data rates of 25 Megabits per second, instead of 250 kilobits, and a range of up to 1 km, instead of 10 meters,” says Schnacke.

Key to the ability of the technology to deliver that kind of performance is the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) dedication of a large block of radio frequency spectrum, from 5.850 to 5.925 GHz (the 5.9 GHz band), to DSRC applications.

Historically, the terms RFID and DSRC have been used synonymously to describe a technology based on tags and readers. But with the advent of the 5.9 GHz band, more attention is being given to differentiating these terms. Although the 5.9 GHz DSRC system will essentially consist of tags and readers, it will be different from traditional RFID in many ways. The DSRC system will be more like a peer-to-peer system in which either end of a link can initiate a transaction; traditional RFID systems operate in a master-slave arrangement. This peer-to-peer architecture will be necessary because many planned applications are vehicle-to-vehicle ones, not involving the roadside RFID readers at all.

DSRC and traditional RFID differ in other ways: DSRC will use a modulation type that breaks data down into small parts and transmits them in parallel within a wide channel, whereas traditional RFID sends everything in series over a narrow channel. This basic difference makes it possible for DSRC to offer a much higher data transmission speed than RFID does. Because of its long read-range, DSRC must be able to operate in a condition of multiple overlapping communication zones—a condition that most RFID systems today could not meet. DSRC must also dynamically control such things as emitted power, channels and message priorities—things that current RFID systems cannot do.

The DSRC Industry Consortium, which was formed in late 1999 and held its first official meeting in February 2000, will receive $1.3 million from the FHWA in the first phase of the DRSC prototype initiative. Designs for the first DRSC hardware should be completed within the next four months. These systems will consist of roadside monitors and sensors that can detect certain road conditions and situations and then transmit related information to DRSC transreceivers installed in vehicles. Funding for the manufacture and testing of the systems, which is expected to take an additional 11 months, has not been disclosed.

Any DRSC system would require DRSC technology to be built into new vehicles. The in-vehicle components would likely consist of a DRSC transreceiver linked to warning signals or lights to alert the driver of any impending danger. According to Schnacke, a number of major automotive manufacturers are already studying the potential for such systems.




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Last edited by wawadave on Wed Apr 14, 2004 4:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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suzi
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2004 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My gawd! The government might as well microchip all of us right now. Evil or Very Mad At the rate they are going, it's just a matter of time.
The mark of the beast... Shocked
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2004 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

suzi that has given me an idea. they implanting these in cows and pets next. why not people..............
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2004 9:05 am    Post subject: Companies' RFID plans fuzzy so far Reply with quote

Tech Home | e-insider | Reviews | @Play | Today's Paper | Investor

Companies' RFID plans fuzzy so far


By MATT HINES
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

E-mail this Article
Print this Article




Advertisement



The mandates are coming. The mandates are coming.

Some of the largest commercial outlets in the United States and abroad have established requirements for their suppliers to begin using radio frequency identification technology before the end of this year. Yet finding a company willing to admit where it stands with RFID is often an exercise in listening to dead air.

With retail giants such as Wal-Mart Stores, Target and German retailer Metro Group, along with the U.S. Department of Defence, requiring their suppliers to use RFID, the technology has rapidly progressed from buzzword fodder to a serious business issue.

Typically, requirements for new technology generate a whirlwind of press releases from companies trumpeting their success in meeting the mandate challenge. But with RFID, which uses chips that carry detailed inventory data and radio frequency technology to track them, that hasn't been the case.

Most suppliers, when asked about their RFID plans, say they can't show their hands and offer rivals potentially valuable insight into what may become a major competitive differentiator. But some industry watchers say the suppliers' silence is more an indication that they still don't know how to tackle RFID.

Even the companies responsible for much of the attention focused on RFID aren't willing to detail their plans. Both Target and Wal-Mart have remained tight-lipped about their own progress. Joshua Walker, an analyst at Cambridge, Mass.-based Forrester Research, says the silence isn't all that surprising.

"If you're behind the curve, obviously, you'd

read the rest at:
http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040415.gtrfid0415/BNStory/Technology/

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2004 2:41 pm    Post subject: rfid come to cell phones Reply with quote


rfid tags comeing to cell phones now.http://slashdot.org/articles/04/04/14/1222227.shtml?tid=100&tid=137

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2004 10:36 am    Post subject: Next Flavor of UHF for RFID Reply with quote

April 20, 2004
Next Flavor of UHF for RFID
By Susan Kuchinskas
http://www.internetnews.com/xSP/article.php/3343151

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2004 11:31 am    Post subject: Wal-Mart Starts RFID Trial Run in Texas Reply with quote

Wal-Mart Starts RFID Trial Run in Texas
By Mark Hachman
April 30, 2004


Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said Friday that it has begun a previously planned trial rollout of RFID tags at eight sites in Texas.
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1581793,00.asp


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2004 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Remind me not to shop at Wal-mart!
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PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

suzi this is just a reminder "don,t shop a wall mart!"lol Wink
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PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have no problem of not shopping at any Wal-Mart in Texas. Rolling Eyes
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PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ken only 2,000 miles out of your way to shop there!lol Very Happy Guy with axe
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PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess this is not the place to tell you that I use RFID's at work.....



No, it's not Walmart.
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PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nick if its part of your job and not your choice not much you can do. i beleave they can have there place. but i have allready found that they are being abused.
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PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2004 4:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
My gawd! The government might as well microchip all of us right now. At the rate they are going, it's just a matter of time.


Suzi I believe governments' are doing something simular to people on parole. I seem to recall parents having chips installed in thier children so they can find them easily.

It's all frightening. The responsible governments or at least the ones that care about civil liberties will likley but some restraint on that kind of activity. But once this technology becomes cheap enough I can imagine many third world governments forcing all their people to have these tags implanted on them (cough) China.

I think George Orwell's book 1984 should be manditory reading in high schools
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PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2004 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cruzin i think as you do this just might be the start of far worse things to come.
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PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2004 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was alway more of a Brave New World kind of guy, but it seems that Mr Orwell may have been more right after all. Good news, your chocolate ration is now 3 micrograms!

Might as well read Animal Farm, too. It's pretty short, only around 120 pages long, and I read it in only 3 hours or so one afternoon.


The ones I use are keys to open doors. The range on them is nothing, and you almost have to touch the reader for it to unlock. The records of when you enter and exit are the way they can track you.
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nick was not animal farm a comedy?
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nick, thanks for reminding me of the book animal farm. I read it when I was about 20 yrs old.
I think if I reread it now i would get alot more out of it as my appreaction and knowledge of history has increased vastly.

Well off to the library. And yes, if I recall proberly that would be another book that should be manditory reading in high school.
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dang you mean i meesed out on a vary good book. i have read so many. and i missed one Crying or Very sad
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

back to the main subject rfid tags.............................

California Crackdown on RFID
[April 30, 2004] A bill setting privacy standards for the tiny transponders
has cleared the Senate.
Read the article:
http://nl.internet.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=1,vic,1,a7na,kqnw,9s3s,a9gz

Wal-Mart RFID Tests Underway
[April 30, 2004] The retail world is taking notes on the retail giant's first
foray into 'case and pallet' level wireless tagging.
Read the article:
http://nl.internet.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=1,vic,1,dcfa,b8jk,9s3s,a9gz
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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2004 11:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hello
i found a weblog on rfid tags
thought it was worth a look
http://rfid.weblogsinc.com/
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PostPosted: Sun May 09, 2004 9:44 am    Post subject: rfid in your master cards Reply with quote

rfid in your master cards now!
http://slashdot.org/articles/04/05/07/2148203.shtml?tid=126&tid=98&tid=99

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PostPosted: Sun May 09, 2004 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh my, now you can truly buy anything on the net.

clicky me
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PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2004 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

California Senate OKs Bill To Limit RFID Use :: http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=19205578

IBM slams RFID criticism as 'anti-retail' :: http://news.zdnet.co.uk/communications/0,39020336,39153344,00.htm
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PostPosted: Wed May 12, 2004 5:44 pm    Post subject: Wal-Mart has crossed our line in the sand Reply with quote

Dear CASPIAN Members and Subscribers:

Wal-Mart has crossed our line in the sand and has begun placing LIVE
RFID TAGS on individual consumer goods. Last week, they began stocking
the shelves of seven Dallas-Ft.Worth area stores with Hewlett Packard
products with live spychips affixed. Wal-Mart has no plans to deactivate
the tags at the register and instead tells customers they can deal with
the tags themselves.

Wal-Mart executive vice president and chief information officer Linda
Dillman said:

"...down the road there are so many possibilities to improve the
shopping experience that we hope customers will actually share our
enthusiasm about EPCs," Dillman said, referring to the RFID-based
Electronic Product Code industry hopes will replace the barcode. "As we
look forward five, 10 years, we see the possibility of offering
expedited returns, quicker warranty processing and other ways to
minimize waiting in lines."

Of course, each of these applications requires leaving the tags "live"
on products after sale, where they can be used to invade consumers'
privacy. (To see how, please refer to information on our website at
http://www.spychips.com.)

It's time to roll up our sleeves and give Wal-Mart a lesson in "consumer
acceptance"!

In freedom,

Katherine Albrecht,
Founder and Director, CASPIAN
Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering

==================================

Wal-Mart's press release:
shortened link click me

Wal-Mart's FAQ:
Shortened link, click me

==================================

Here is our response:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 11, 2004

Wal-Mart Tries New PR Spin to Accompany Item-level RFID Tagging
"Selling the technology with partial truths is unethical," says CASPIAN

Despite widespread consumer opposition, Wal-Mart began item-level RFID
(radio frequency identification) tagging of consumer goods last week as
part of a trial in Texas. In an apparent effort to minimize the backlash
to its use of RFID tags, Wal-Mart has also begun a public relations
campaign to promote the technology that some are calling unethical.

Shoppers at seven Dallas-Ft. Worth area Wal-Mart stores can walk into
the consumer electronics department and find Hewlett-Packard products
for sale with live RFID tags attached. Wal-Mart's public statements
appear to leave open the possibility that other goods could be tagged
with RFID as well.

The giant retailer's decision to tag individual items on the store floor
violates a call for a moratorium on such tagging issued last November by
over 40 of the world's most respected privacy and civil liberties
organizations. The move has sparked sharp criticism by the privacy
community.

"Wal-Mart is blatantly ignoring the research and recommendations of
dozens of privacy experts," says Katherine Albrecht, Founder and
Director of CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and
Numbering). "When the world's largest retailer adopts a technology with
chilling societal implications, and does so irresponsibly, we should all
be deeply concerned."

In addition to violating the call for a moratorium on RFID-tagged items
in stores, Wal-Mart has begun a consumer education campaign that CASPIAN
is calling unethical.

"Read the FAQs at the Wal-Mart corporate web site and you'll find plenty
of half truths," Albrecht says. "They call it consumer education, but
the omissions and spin make it feel more like a calculated
disinformation campaign."

Albrecht provides the example of Wal-Mart's statement that RFID tags in
its stores are harmless since they contain nothing more than
identification numbers. "While technically that's true, Wal-Mart fails
to explain what it means for items to carry remote-readable unique ID
numbers. It's like saying someone's social security number is 'only' a
number, so sharing it with perfect strangers should be of no concern."

Albrecht explains that many major retailers today routinely link
shoppers' identity information from credit, ATM and "loyalty" cards with
product bar code numbers to record individuals' purchases over time. "If
nothing is done to stop it, the same will happen with the unique RFID
numbers on products. This means that if retailers can read an RFID tag
on a product they previously sold you, they can identify you as you walk
in the door and even pinpoint your location in their store as you shop,"
she said.

Albrecht also criticizes Wal-Mart for failing to tell consumers of the
retailer's long-term goals for RFID. "The industry plan is to put an
RFID tag on every product on Earth to identify and locate them at any
time, anywhere. Wal-Mart is taking the first steps to creating a society
where everything could be surveilled at all times. A shopper would
hardly learn this by reading their website."

With potentially billions of dollars riding on RFID, global corporations
are eager to see it deployed. However, consumer acceptance has proved to
be an obstacle.

Procter & Gamble's own research suggests that 78 percent of consumers
surveyed reacted negatively to the technology on privacy grounds and did
not find industry reassurances compelling. Another industry study,
published in January 2003, found similar misgivings among focus groups
of consumers in the U.S., Germany, France, Japan and the UK.

The most publicized trial of item-level RFID tagging to date, Metro-AG's
"Future Store" in Rheinberg, Germany, met with massive consumer outcry
earlier this year, culminating in a protest outside the store.

"Wal-Mart may soon be facing a similar backlash," said Albrecht.

==========================================================

The press has already begun to pick up the story:

The Register, UK: "Wal-Mart attracts further RFID flak"
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/05/12/wal_mart_rfid_flak/

==========================================================

CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering)
is a grass-roots consumer group fighting retail surveillance schemes
since 1999, and item-level RFID tagging since 2002. With members in all
50 U.S. states and over 30 nations across the globe, CASPIAN seeks to
educate consumers about marketing strategies that invade their privacy
and to encourage privacy-conscious shopping habits across the retail
spectrum.

CASPIAN is guided by free market principles. Rather than look to
lawmakers for solutions to the consumer privacy problem, we call on
consumers to reject privacy-invading practices so that they fail in the
marketplace.

For more information, see
http://www.spychips.com
and
http://www.nocards.org

==========================================================

We encourage you to duplicate and distribute this message to others.

==========================================================




Edited links to prevent horizontal scrolling, Nick
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PostPosted: Wed May 12, 2004 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rfid tags are now getting implanted into people!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

RFID Implants for Spanish Revelers |
| from the also,-the-spca-will-return-you-to-your-owner-if-lost dep|
| posted by michael on Wednesday May 12, @14:06 (tech) |
| http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/05/12/1655222 |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+

[0]WWW/X writes "[1]USA Today reports that [2]clubbers in Barcelona are
getting drunk and being implanted on site with RFID chips in order to pay
their bills without carrying around bulky items such as credit cards. The
article states that the implant can go anywhere, however it does not
state whether anyone has chosen their forehead." The club's website
[3]describes the program (link in spanish).

Discuss this story at:
http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=04/05/12/1655222

Links:
0. http://star.slashdot.com
1. http://www.usatoday.com/
2. http://www.usatoday.com/usatonline/20040512/6194271s.htm
3. http://www.baja-beachclub.com/bajaes/asp/zonavip.aspx


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PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2004 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HP DEBUTS RFID SERVICES
Hewlett-Packard unveiled on Monday services for companies trying to
start radio frequency identification projects.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=5191
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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2004 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Munich faces RFID-controlled congestion charge
By Jan Libbenga
Published Monday 24th May 2004 14:46 GMT
The German Green Party intends to designate the centre of Munich as a tolled zone to significantly reduce the amount of traffic on its streets, and has suggested using RFID tags for car registration.

Every vehicle would have to carry a RFID transponder card emitting a unique registration code. The number plates of unregistered cars entering the city would be photographed, so they could be charged later.

The plans are similar to the congestion charge scheme introduced more than a year ago in London. The system requires drivers to pay £5 per day if they wish to continue driving within the designated congestion zone London.

At midnight, images of all of the vehicles in London that have been in the zone are checked against the vehicle registration numbers of vehicles which have paid their congestion charge for that day. The computer keeps the registration numbers of vehicles that should have paid, but have not done so.

Green party members have been pressing for congestion charge schemes for most German cities, where the amount of traffic can also be very high. Munich has by far the worst congestion. Stockholm - pretty quiet compared to most European cities - already plans to follow London’s example in 2005. ®
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2004 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CASPIAN NEWSLETTER, 06/14/04: The newsletter is back!

=====================================================================
Consumer privacy and RFID newsletter
Edited by Sunni Maravillosa

THIS WEEK:
1- Media Appearance Tonight
2- Publisher's Note
3- Editor's Note
4- Feature: Is the end of privacy near?
5- Activism tools you can use

=====================================================================
MEDIA APPEARANCE TONIGHT
=====================================================================

COAST TO COAST AM TONIGHT!
11PM-2AM Pacific time

CASPIAN founder Katherine Albrecht will be featured on Coast to Coast AM
with George Noory tonight, Monday, June 14. Coast to Coast is one of the
most listened-to radio programs in America, with over half a million
listeners. Don't miss this chance to hear Katherine live!

To find a station near you that carries the broadcast, go to:
http://www.coasttocoastam.com/info/wheretolisten.html

=====================================================================
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
=====================================================================

Dear CASPIAN members and friends,

I'm pleased to announce that our popular newsletter is back, and will
begin publication on a weekly schedule. There's a lot to keep up with
in the areas of supermarket/consumer privacy and RFID, so it's more
important than ever to stay on top of things. If you don't wish to
receive our weekly newsletter, please follow the instuctions at the
bottom of this message, and we'll remove you from our list.

Part of the reason we're able to bring the newsletter back is the
addition of a new CASPIAN staff member, Sunni Maravillosa, whom some of
you may know from her work at Free-Market.Net (online at
http://www.free-market.net). Sunni (pronounced "Sunny") has joined the
staff as the editor for our newsletter.

Says Sunni, "The increasing use of corporate database information --
often collected without the customer's knowledge, let alone consent --
in questionable ways by corporations or by governments, has made it
clear that CASPIAN's work is more urgent than ever. I'm a long-time
supporter, and happy to be aboard in an official capacity."

Though Sunni is too modest to boast about it herself, she has a Ph.D. in
Psychology and a solid research and teaching background. I have long
admired her work on freedom and privacy issues and feel honored to have
her working with us. Look for Sunni to contribute to our work in other
ways in the future. Welcome aboard, Sunni!

In other good news, our efforts on RFID and consumer privacy issues
continue to reach more and more people. Look for several major
television programs, well-read magazines and newspapers to feature
CASPIAN's work in coming weeks.

As just one example, tonight I will be a guest on Coast to Coast AM with
George Noory, a three-hour program with over half a million listeners.
If you have any friends or family members who still don't get why RFID
and retail surveillance are so alarming, ask them to tune in to
tonight's broadcast where they can learn the whole story.

And as always, thanks to each of you for your ongoing support.

In freedom,

Katherine Albrecht
Founder and Director, CASPIAN

=====================================================================
EDITOR'S NOTE
=====================================================================

Hello everyone,

Thanks, Katherine, for the warm welcome, and thanks to you readers
for the hot tips some of you have already begun sending my way! For
those who may not know me, I'd like to give you a brief introduction
to me, and my work.

I'm a psychologist and longtime freedom activist; currently I am the
Director of Operations for Free-Market.Net, and the editor of its
daily newsletter, Freedom News Daily. CASPIAN has been an FMN partner
for some time, so I've been reading about what y'all have been doing,
and covering related news items. Privacy issues have been important
to me for a long time, and recently, it's become clear that many
people seem to have the mistaken idea that governments are the only
groups that can be enemies of privacy. Rather than go into that at
length here, I'll save it for the featured essay of this newsletter.

If you want more information about me, please visit my personal web
site at http://www.sunnimaravillosa.com/ . It's a slowly progressing
archive of all my writings, which span a wide range of topics.
Obviously, you may not agree with all of my outside views, but as
Katherine says, "while we may differ on outside issues, we are united by
a common belief: It is wrong to spy on people through the products and
services they buy." I think we all can agree with that!

It's great to be among energetic individuals who share both my
concerns about our vanishing privacy, and the willingness to do
something about changing that situation. As I settle in to the
newsletter editor job, you'll see some changes. I could never replace
Katherine's informed and energetic style, but I hope to keep the best
of her approach while adding my own strengths. Suggestions, comments,
and URLs for items of interest can be sent to me at
sunni@nocards.org. I won't be able to respond to each email, but I
will give your input serious consideration. Thanks for caring, and
for taking the time to help me make the CASPIAN newsletter an
invaluable resource.

Now let's get to business!

Sunni


=====================================================================
FEATURE: IS THE END OF PRIVACY NEAR?
=====================================================================

I've never really thought of myself as the alarmist type, but the
recent news on the privacy front has been almost all bad. Maybe it's
just a touch of "privacy paranoia". Add to that a recent feature by
Reason Magazine that questions whether we really need all that
privacy, and I'm starting to feel some "conspiracy fever" coming on
too. Is it the "privacy flu", or what? Whatever it is, it sure has
many privacy advocates concerned.

First, Reason Magazine. If you're unfamiliar with Reason, it's a
libertarian group publishing a print mag and a web site that features
daily updates and a blog. Their June print issue got a lot of media
attention even before its release (1). It featured a unique cover
for each subscriber -- a satellite map with the subscriber's home
enclosed in a big red circle (2). Ads inside the article are also
tailored to the subscriber's geographic area. But the real kicker is
the featured article, titled "Database Nation" (3). Reason editor
Nick Gillespie introduced it with a bit titled "Kiss privacy goodbye
-- and good riddance, too." (4)

Gillespie justifies this view by saying that being in a database
nation "makes life easier and more prosperous". So ... that means
we should just shut up and accept it? Am I the only one who finds
this as offensive as the "it's inevitable, so lie back and enjoy
it" advice given to potential rape victims?

What happened to that fundamental principle underlying free markets
-- the ability to choose? Declan McCullagh (who wrote the "Database
Nation" feature) and Gillespie may be completely at home in a
society where everyone lives in a glass home, but what about those
of us who like something a little less transparent -- or even
totally opaque?

The implication from this position seems to be that government
databases are bad, but corporate databases are good. They're good,
in this view, because they allow commerce to happen easier and
faster. And everyone knows those are always good, right? Well, *I*
don't know that, and nobody has been able to convince me of
it yet. A glaring example is credit fraud. Easier and faster just
means that more of this kind of fraud can happen, which ends up
costing all consumers more, both in higher prices and more intrusive
requirements for information.

Besides, where do government databases come from? Well, aside from
the many databases they collect from all the pieces of paper we're
required to have (birth certificate, marriage license, driver's
license, occupational certification/license/permit, building permit,
pet license -- the list goes on), they buy them from corporations.
Or they subpoena them, or use some other legal threat to get the
information they want. And then they (both governments and
businesses) do interesting things with them, like:

Using them to set up government screening programs (5, 6);

Coming after people who've been targeted (whether rightly or
wrongly) with nonpayment of government fines or fees (7);

Tallying the number of painkillers you've been prescribed, so
that either you or your doctor -- or both of you (and maybe even
your pharmacist, too) -- can be arrested for drug abuse (8, 9, 10);
and

Tracking your movements across the region, or across the world (11).

Do you feel better knowing that the last pizza you ordered to be
delivered to your home may have put you in a database your state
government bought for debt collection? Remember, once they have
the database they can use it for other reasons. Maybe your state
will pass so-called "anti-obesity" laws, and if you order too
many pizzas too often your kids may be taken by the state, in order
to protect them, of course. Or maybe your purchasing habits at
Costco could be used against you in a custody battle, or in a
hiring decision (12).

Would you like to be a hospital patient, knowing that your every
movement was tracked by an ID tag? Even better, would you like to
have a job where your every move was logged via RFID tags? (13)

Privacy is not a one-size-fits-all item. Some individuals have no
problem giving up all kinds of information -- you'll see lots of
them on television these days. Some individuals like to keep
personal business private, but are okay with giving some other
information in order to get something they want -- or to make a
transaction easier or faster. Some individuals, like me, will
counter almost every request for information with, "What do you
need to know THAT for?" Each person ought to be able to wear a
cloak of privacy that suits his or her comfort.

Right now, that's very difficult. After all, who knew that every
pizza purchase from a national chain was going into a computer
database? And who would have dreamed that state governments would
start buying such databases as a means to find people? I bet most
people don't even think about the fact that when they buy groceries
with a so-called consumer loyalty card, those items are being
included in a personal database that tracks all purchases made with
that card. Those who criticize us for our concern over possible
privacy invasions of tracking on grounds that we're naive or trying
to stifle market forces often seem to miss the point that if we
don't know about tracking devices, our concerns can't be easily
dismissed (14).

If I don't want to have my grocery purchases logged, I ought to be
able to do so, without penalty for that choice. I should be able to
open a bank account, get a job, leave the hospital with my newborn
child, or transact other business without needing a Social Security
number. I should have a reasonable confidence that my shampoo or
razor purchases don't make me a marked woman in a store -- or beyond
its doors (15).

Changes in consumer privacy are coming fast, with Wal-Mart pushing
RFID tagging around the world, and the technology becoming smaller
and cheaper. Most consumers, even in shopper-savvy places like the
U.S. and western Europe, are totally unaware of the databases
already being collected, let alone the new technology that makes
tracking even easier. That's why I, in a recent essay, called
activists like us "privacy's canaries" (16). We're the ones who read
all this stuff, and help spread the word about its possible use
and abuse, to others. We need to keep the heat on both government
agencies and private corporations, so that those of us who value
privacy can make informed choices about where to do business.

That's what it comes down to: accurate information (17) and the
ability to make our own choices. Those who want to live in a Database
Nation will have no argument from me -- as long as I'm given the
same courtesy, in choosing to live in my wood-paneled, private
little nook with small windows.

-----
References:
(To reconstruct two-line links, cut and paste; delete any spaces)

(1) http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/05/business/05reason.html
(2) http://www.reason.com/0406/june.shtml
(3) http://www.reason.com/0406/fe.dm.database.shtml
(4) http://www.reason.com/0406/ed.ng.editors.shtml
(5) http://www.fcw.com/fcw/articles/2004/0405/
web-jetblue-04-07-04.asp
(6) http://news.com.com/2100-1025_3-5189675.html?tag=nefd.top
(7) http://www.semissourian.com/story.html$rec=135319
(Cool http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04125/310751.stm
(9) http://www.dailystar.com/dailystar/news/18744.php
(10) http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2004/05/
20/MNGK36OR7D1.DTL
(11) http://www.unexpectedsummer.com/index_flash.html
(12) http://www.latimes.com/business/
la-fi-almond25may25,1,194279.story
(13) http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/961/1/1/
(14) http://www.techcentralstation.com/052404F.html
(15) http://www.spychips.com/metro/overview.html
(16) http://www.thepriceofliberty.org/04/05/07/sunni.htm
(17) http://www.spychips.com/press-releases/wal-mart-texas.html


=====================================================================
ACTIVISM TOOLS YOU CAN USE
=====================================================================

SEND THE FTC YOUR COMMENTS ON RFID USES
The FTC is holding a workshop titled "Radio Frequency IDentification:
Applications and Implications for Consumers" on June 21 in Washington
DC. The event is open to the general public and our own Katherine
Albrecht will be among the featured speakers. The FTC is also accepting
email comments on the subject. Please browse their information, and
share your thoughts on this fast-moving technology. COMMENTS DEADLINE IS
JULY 9, 2004.

http://www.ftc.gov/rfidworkshop/


HAVE YOU HEARD THE RFID-NAZI CARD RUMOR?
If you've been anywhere on the web where privacy is valued, you've
probably seen or been emailed a story alleging that Matrics' loyalty
card's RFID tag is supposed to be a swastika. While the shape is
somewhat similar, Katherine Albrecht dispels the notion of sinister
intent. She reports that a Matrics employee told her that the shape
allows the card to be read remotely, no matter what its orientation in a
shopper's purse or wallet. And isn't that scary enough?

http://www.spychips.com/tag_images.html (scroll down for the tag)


RFID BUMPER STICKER DESIGNS
RFIDiocy currently has four different anti RFID bumper-sticker-sized
designs ready for printing. Graphics are protected under an open
copyright.

http://www.weirdbytes.com/rfid/bstickers.htm


RFID LOG
Blog site that focuses primarily on U.S. RFID advances. Lots of
information, very little editorializing. Assumes some understanding
of technology and jargon.

http://www.rfidlog.com/


And that's it for this week! Thanks for reading, staying informed,
and pushing for privacy.

Confidentially yours,

Sunni


=====================================================================

CASPIAN: Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering
A national consumer organization opposing supermarket "loyalty" cards
and other retail surveillance schemes since 1999

http://www.nocards.org/
http://www.spychips.com/

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.

=====================================================================

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2004 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Charles Walton, the Father of RFID |
| from the rtfm-on-rfid dept. |
| posted by simoniker on Monday June 14, @16:16 (tech) |
| http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/06/14/1716239 |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+

[0]Roland Piquepaille writes "In a very interesting article, the San Jose
Mercury News tells us about [1]Charles Walton, the man behind the radio
frequency identification technology (RFID). Since his first patent about
it in 1973, Walton, now 83 years old, collected about $3 million from
royalties coming from his patents. Unfortunately for him, his latest
patent about RFID expired in the mid-1990s. So he will not make any money
from the billions of RFID tags that will appear in the years to come. But
he continues to invent and his latest patent about a proximity card with
incorporated PIN code protection was granted in June 2004. Maybe he'll be
luckier with this one. [2]This overview contains some excerpts of the
original article. It also contains tips to search for Walton's patents
and an image of the front page of his first patent."

Discuss this story at:
http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=04/06/14/1716239

Links:
0. http://radio.weblogs.com/0105910/
1. http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/8861856.htm
2. http://radio.weblogs.com/0105910/2004/06/14.html
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 23, 2004 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Embedding Their Hopes In RFID
Tagging Technology Promises Efficiency but Raises Privacy Issue
At Matrics Inc., based in Rockville, manufactures its RFID tags at a plant in Columbia. (Courtesy Of Matrics Inc.)

• Keeping Track Companies are finding many uses for radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, which can be monitored to track an object's movement.
_____Related Articles_____

• U.S. May Use New ID Cards At Borders (The Washington Post, Jun 5, 2004)
• Pentagon Boosts High-Tech Tagging (The Washington Post, Dec 18, 2003)

By Jonathan Krim
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, June 23, 2004; Page E01


To John Kendall, casino gambling will soon look like this:

A player sits down at a blackjack table and bets a stack of chips, which Kendall hopes are manufactured by his company, Chipco International of Raymond, Maine. Sensors trained on the betting area of the table scan tiny computer tags embedded in the chips, and electronically report the amount of the bet to a security control room.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62061-2004Jun22.html

this is a 4 page write up on rfid. seems more of a pro artical. But it dose mention a famaly who volinteered to have the chips implanted!

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2004 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FEATURE: ARE WE PARANOID, OR ANTI-TECHNOLOGY, OR WHAT?
=====================================================================

Last week's reintroduction of the CASPIAN newsletter and Katherine
Albrecht's appearance on the Coast to Coast radio program brought a
flood of email to both of us. While much of it was very supportive, some
individuals claimed that groups like CASPIAN are "paranoid" or are
"overreacting". Instead of the "fear-mongering", some said we should buy
stocks in RFID and related technologies and then sit back and enjoy the
good life. I doubt that most readers are surprised to learn that I've
not invested my life's savings in RFID technology. Even so, these
objections to CASPIAN's mission, and that of related groups, shouldn't
be taken lightly.

It is undeniably true that product tagging can improve a company's
product supply chain. It's also true that product tagging might make
some products cheaper, through better tracking and loss prevention, once
the costs of tagging are low enough. I don't know of any individual who
objects to these benefits of tagging, assuming that they are the
motivation behind tagging. What groups like CASPIAN object to are the
real, and coming, intrusions into an individual's privacy via RFID tags
and consumer loyalty cards.

For example, Wal-Mart boasted last month that its electronic product
code (EPC) rollout in the Dallas/Forth Worth area got off to a positive
start (1). The switch from bar codes to EPCs, which involves RFID
technology and which Wal-Mart has been touting as an improvement over
bar codes (2), was accompanied by a PR campaign designed to sway
individuals who disliked bar code technology. What this campaign failed
to mention is that the use of RFID technology, particularly when it is
placed on individual items rather than pallets or shipping containers,
can be an even more egregious violation of individual privacy than bar
codes. (3)

The half-truths accompanying Wal-Mart's push to adopt RFID tagging are
alarming enough, as Katherine Albrecht outlined in her press release
(3). However, Wal-Mart is leaning on its suppliers very hard for the
adoption of RFID tagging technology. Currently, eight suppliers are
working with Wal-Mart on the case/pallet RFID tagging trials in Dallas.
They are:
- Gillette Co.;
- Hewlett-Packard Co. (doing some item-level tagging);
- Johnson & Johnson;
- Kimberly-Clark;
- Kraft Foods;
- Nestle Purina PetCare Company;
- Procter & Gamble; and
- Unilever (4).

The March issue of Food Processing Magazine (5) admits that RFID tagging
is happening "largely because Wal-Mart wants it to be." But the tagging
is not without obstacles, especially for food processors; for example,
it's hard to tag liquids and metal. And it brings significant costs to
suppliers, which Wal-Mart has said that it won't help defray.

While it's true that a company is free to choose whether to enter into
business with Wal-Mart or not, it's also true that Wal-Mart is the
largest retailer in the world. (In fact, Wal-Mart is so big that some
pundits have credited the retail giant with single-handedly keeping the
U.S. economy from getting in a worse state than it is.) That doesn't
leave manufacturers with a lot of choices when it comes to selling
products; and it probably means even fewer choices for consumers who are
concerned about RFID monitoring and consumer databases.

That's the bottom line for privacy groups like CASPIAN: consumer choice.
A consumer who wants greater privacy ought to be able to make that
choice. Yet, is it likely that a company like Procter & Gamble will
offer two identical products, with the only difference being the
presence of an RFID tag? With the enormous economic clout a retailer
like Wal-Mart or a manufacturing giant like Nestle has, their blanket
adoption of RFID means that consumers have fewer choices. A recent
Guardian (UK) article neatly summarizes the "myth of choice" many
consumers face (6): it simply isn't economically feasible for some
individuals, especially the elderly and infirm, to "vote with their
feet" by shopping at markets that offer the privacy or other services or
goods they prefer -- assuming such markets even exist.

Customers are more than mere vehicles for the transfer of capital. We
are full participants in the economic process. It is consumer choice
that led to Coca Cola's new formula (remember that?) being rejected; it
is consumer choice that led to Wal-Mart becoming the dominant retail
force in the U.S. Even though Wal-Mart is a huge market player, not all
small-time or specialty stores have died -- in fact, some have
flourished in Wal-Mart's shadow. Why? Because those stores cater to some
niche that Wal-Mart cannot or will not fill. Sometimes that niche
involves specialty items; sometimes it's good customer service.

But a consumer who isn't fully informed can't make a real choice. As
Wal-Mart has already demonstrated, companies can "spin" their goals and
intentions to make it sound as if what they're doing is completely
innocuous and good for the consumer, when what they're doing could lead
to a decrease in privacy. While CASPIAN isn't a pro-regulatory
organization, the one area where it maintains that legislation can help
protect consumers is in labeling laws. As long as companies exist in a
culture that allows "little white lies" and accepts some amount of
fudging of the truth, they will engage in such deceptive behavior.
That's why voluntary labeling regulations, like the one calling for
voluntary country of origin labeling (7), are met with skepticism.
Accidents can happen (Cool, and should be dealt with appropriately by
consumers and watchdog agencies. But a pattern of systematic, willful
deception or covering up has no place in a free society. Laws that
protect consumers against fraud are therefore justified.

Who knows where tagging and consumer tracking will head in the future?
Could anyone have predicted from the days when Radio Shack was alone in
asking for a customer's address that getting a zip code along with
payment for a sale would be commonplace? Who would have predicted that
AC Nielson would open an RFID "learning lab" for putting chips in its
products (and what ARE its products, anyway)? (9) When the FBI's
technological experts make a mistake with fingerprints (10), it doesn't
inspire a lot of confidence that companies like Kroger are responsibly
using biometric technology to track employees, and in some areas of the
U.S., in customer transactions (11).

Collecting information means that information can and will be used --
and as I made clear in my last essay, bought and sold. Often corporate
databases get used in ways that are completely unexpected; some of these
uses will be unwanted by consumers (12). Making an informed choice means
that each consumer will be able to "vote" in the marketplace by clearly
stating his or her preferences, not only for products but for services.
If tagging consumer items and data-mining are pushed on consumers by
businesses (often with the state's help) without meaningful consumer
choice, then we all have lost.

Some individuals do long for days when a sticky price tag adorned each
item on a store's shelf, not for the convenience but simply because it
is a low-technology system. More individuals appreciate the conveniences
of technology, but aren't willing to blindly accept those without a
critical assessment of the risks. No one is more interested in keeping
information private than the individual whose information is at stake.
Governments and businesses alike have shown themselves to be willing to
bend on privacy, especially when they think there's little attention or
opposition. Groups like CASPIAN aren't naive enough to think that ID
will magically become unnecessary. Rather, we prefer a free market that
offers real, private choices, with rewards for good performance and
penalties for poor performance; this is just as applicable for
information technology as it is for restaurants (13).

Many organizations rightly question the state's role in information
collection, distribution, and use; CASPIAN is one of the few that shines
a similar spotlight on corporations' use and abuse of consumer
information. Without customers, a business will die. In my experience,
most privacy activists understand that consumer information is a
valuable commodity, now that it can be easily collected and used. What
we don't want is its widespread abuse, or an absence of choices for
those who wish to opt out of databases, or even just certain uses of
databases. All we really want is some consumer respect. (14) And we
aren't going to stop questioning, and challenging, and making a fuss
until we get it.


References:
(To reconstruct multi-line links, cut and paste; delete any spaces;
or copy-paste one line at a time, without spaces)

1) http://www.walmartstores.com/wmstore/wmstores/Mainnews.jsp?BV_
SessionID=@@@@1963874720.1088028997@@@@&BV_EngineID=
cccjadcljlggefdcfkfcfkjdgoodglh.0&pagetype=news&template=
NewsArticle.jsp&categoryOID=-8300&contentOID=13839&catID=
-8248&prevPage=NewsShelf.jsp&year=2004

2) http://www.walmartstores.com/wmstore/wmstores/Mainnews.jsp?BV_
SessionID=@@@@1963874720.1088028997@@@@&BV_EngineID=
cccjadcljlggefdcfkfcfkjdgoodglh.0&pagetype=news&template=
NewsArticle.jsp&categoryOID=-8300&contentOID=13794&catID=
null&prevPage=NewsShelf.jsp&year=2004

3) http://www.spychips.com/press-releases/wal-mart-texas.html

4) http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1612365,00.asp

5) http://www.foodprocessing.com/Web_First/fp.nsf/ArticleID/DFUO-
5WSUPU?OpenDocument

6) http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/story/0,3604,1238875,00.html

7) http://www.agriculture.com/default.sph/AgNews.class?FNC=goDetail
__ANewsindex_html___51842___1

Cool http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/06/07/hdd_wipe_shortcomings/

9) http://www.acnielsen.com/news/american/us/2004/20040415.htm

10) http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2001944007_
fingerprint01m.html

11) http://www.detnews.com/2004/business/0406/23/a01-192603.htm

12) http://www.komotv.com/stories/31775.htm

13) http://www.doingfreedom.com/gen/0304/nonid0304.html

14) http://www.customerrespect.com/upload/Ten_Rules.pdf

=====================================================================
ACTIVISM TOOLS YOU CAN USE
=====================================================================

BUGMENOT LETS YOU INTO "REGISTRATION ONLY" NEWS SITES
Are you tired of being required to log in to see a newspaper web
site? Can't keep up with your current newspaper registration
names and passwords? Ditch 'em and use this handy page. BugMeNot.com
(http://www.bugmenot.com/) asks for the web site you want to access,
then offers you a username and password to access it. You can also
add the registration information you create, to help others log in
to web sites more anonymously. Thanks, BugMeNot!

OPT OUT OF CALLER ID SNOOPING
Did you know that more and more individuals and businesses are using
Caller ID technology to identify you when you make a phone call? This
happens whether you have Caller ID or not -- and can make your telephone
number visible to people you don't want to give it to (even unlisted
numbers are revealed with Caller ID). For a good overview of why you
might want to block Caller ID, and times when you don't want to block
it, please see:

http://www.astound.net/callerID_block.htm

You can opt out of Caller ID, though, by calling your telephone company
and asking for "Caller ID blocking". This service is free in most areas,
and if you value your privacy, it's definitely worth the phone call.
(Note that some calls, such as to 911, can't be blocked.) Check into it,
and if you decide you want greater phone number privacy, sign up for
your company's service -- and be sure to thank them for helping protect
your privacy.

SEND THE FTC YOUR COMMENTS ON RFID USES
There's still a couple of weeks to send your RFID comments to the FTC
regarding consumer use of RFID tags. Please browse their information,
and share your thoughts on this fast-moving technology. COMMENTS
DEADLINE IS JULY 9, 2004.

http://www.ftc.gov/rfidworkshop/


Don't forget to copy-paste the survey at the top of the newsletter
into an email, and indicate your responses before sending it to me
at sunni@nocards.org . Your feedback is much appreciated, and will
help ensure that CASPIAN stays on top of the consumer privacy
issues most important to you. Thanks again!

Confidentially yours,

Sunni


=====================================================================

CASPIAN: Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering

Opposing supermarket "loyalty" cards and other retail surveillance
schemes since 1999

http://www.nocards.org/
http://www.spychips.com/

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 26, 2004 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Damn good thread Dave,

As some one who knows pathetically little about this, one suggestion springs to mind. would not paying cash instead of using c/c stop them using rfid. or does the chip find out where you live.

Another way of course is if they won't kill them at the check out then walk out and shop elsewhere. Hit them where it hurts-- in the pockets.

1984 here we come--rapidly.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 26, 2004 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

aye good day Link!
if the tags are imbeded into goods and every time you pass a scanner you will be trailed and whatched! paying cash will help brake this.but its in the plans that cash will soon be gone.
your idea of boycoting them will work only if enough know to do this.
jmho
and thx!
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2004 4:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And the oddest thing that I have seen about RFID tagging is how long it has actually been around. If you have purchased a CD/DVD/VHS or any of the related type of media playing hardware (including computers) from any of the retailers with a metal detector like structure by the exit, then you have been subject to an RFID tag. Albiet one that is deactivated so as not to set off the alarm.

Funny how technology that was used years ago to reduce theft and help to keep costs for goods down is now coming under attack for being able to "invade privacy."

But then again, the internet was originally supposed to be a repository for information only. And look where that is now.

Rolling Eyes
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 12, 2004 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

skywalker its true the older rfid tags were used like you say.but there more hi-tech than there older conterparts. but the idea is the same.
heres a good artical on them seems informative!

THE BASKET CASE FOR RFID
Radio-frequency chips are retail nirvana. They're the end of privacy.
They're the mark of the beast. Peek inside the tag-and-track
supermarket of the future.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=5545
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2004 5:36 pm    Post subject: Japan school kids to be tagged with RFID chips Reply with quote

Japan school kids to be tagged with RFID chips
Last modified: July 12, 2004, 7:55 PM PDT
By Jo Best
Special to CNET News.com

Japanese authorities decide tracking is best way to protect kids

The rights and wrongs of using radio frequency identification (RFID) tags on humans have been debated since the tracking tags reached the technological mainstream. Now, school authorities in the Japanese city of Osaka have decided the benefits outweigh the disadvantages and will now be chipping children in one primary school.

The tags will be read by readers installed in school gates and other key locations to track the kids' movements.

The chips will be put onto kids' schoolbags, name tags or clothing in one Wakayama prefecture school. Denmark's Legoland introduced a similar scheme last month to stop young children going astray.

RFID is more commonly found in supermarket and other retailers' supply chains, however, companies are now seeking more innovative ways to derive value from the tracking technology. Delta Air Lines recently announced it would be using RFID to track travelers' luggage.

Jo Best of Silicon.com reported from London.

http://news.com.com/Japan+school+kids+to+be+tagged+with+RFID+chips/2100-1012_3-5266700.html?tag=st.pop
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2004 11:26 am    Post subject: SAMSys produces new RFID reader Reply with quote

TORONTO, July 15 — SAMSys Technologies Inc., provider of Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) hardware and consulting services, has announced the introduction of its new MP9320 V2.7 multi-protocol UHF reader, which meets FCC and both current and proposed European ETSI regulatory standards. The introduction of this reader allows multinational companies the capability of standardizing on one reader product which can operate in multiple regulatory settings, including the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) regulation EN302-208 (draft), which calls for frequency hopping in the 865 to 868 MHz bands and limited duty cycle in the transmit mode (listen before talk) at power levels up to 2 watts.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2004 2:33 pm    Post subject: Privacy Groups Tag RFID Reply with quote

Privacy Groups Tag RFID
ACLU, Center for Democracy and Technology push for baseline privacy legislation.
http://nl.internet.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=1,10f7,1,j3n,jabl,9s3s,a9gz
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